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10 Hilarious Tweets About Egyptian Last Names

Some people have the most creative last names. Whether it is their parents’ fault or they found a way to make their last name sound funny, we all know that these tweets are hilarious!

Here are 10 of our favorite posts on Twitter about Egyptian last names:

1) “i like nicknames for my friends but i don’t want one for myself” – @egyptian_lastname

2) “@TheRealNinaD I’m not just some generic girl with a boring name, I’m Samerah from Cairo” – @SamerahCairo

3) “I think this might be the best thing ever.” – @EgyptianLastName

4) “My first name is the first name of my dad’s mom. My last name is my Dad’s last name.” – @Khaled_Cairo

[insert hyperlinks for each tweet]

11) “This might be one of the funniest tweets I’ve ever seen” – @EgyptianLastName

12) “@TheRealNinaD do you know what a sha’abanatyya means?” – Risam from Cairo, Egypt ‍♂️ (@Risamx40)

13)”In case you don’t know Arabic, ‘sha’abaniyyah'”@ Egyptian Last Name ❤️👌🏼😋 pic.twitter.com/SbkcihNcCX

14) “looks like I’m not the only one who has an unusual last name” – @TheRealNinaD

15) “@EgyptianLastName my mom is in agreement about how funny this tweet is and she’s Egyptian too!” – Jaleesah (@Jaleesahsays_)

16)”My dad doesn’t know what to do with his life because he found out that his middle name was ‘Ammad'”@Egyptian Last Name ❤️😂 pic.twitter.com/gQYyFReaEI — Tammy from Cairo, Egypt 🇪🇬 (@Tammyx421205

Egyptian last names can be confusing for non-native speakers, so here are some hilarious tweets about them.

“The Egyptian surnames make no sense,” says one user on Twitter. “I was born in Giza and my surname is ‘El Nada’ which means the nothing.”

This tweet makes reference to how many Egyptians have two or three different family names to represent their lineage and sometimes these do not match up with where they were actually born. One person’s name could also change depending on who writes it out, as Arabic has a script that includes vowels but there are multiple ways of spelling each letter of the alphabet in English without any such distinctions.

Another way that people may end up with a different last name than their parents is if they get married. In this case, the woman would take her husband’s family name and bear his surname in lieu of what she was born with.

This means that some people have a hard time figuring out who is related to whom based on how many names are involved.

This tweet from @sierraDeeMuhlbauer makes light of these difficulties: “I’m so confused by my Egyptian friends’ last names because I don’t know which one to use.” She also uses it as a way to show solidarity with the other Twitter users – “So we’re all just going with Muhlbauer for now?” — but not everyone found it amusing. The responses were mixed between people who thought it was a good joke and people who found it inappropriate.

The humor in the tweet stems from how difficult it can be to figure out which last name goes with whom, especially for those of us not familiar with Egyptian culture or names. Some Twitter users were able to laugh along while others took offense at what they felt is a disrespectful portrayal of Arabic culture.

This same situation also applies when Egyptians adopt Westernized surnames after converting to Christianity; differentiating between one another based on their original family ties becomes even more complicated! In this case, there are multiple reasons why someone might have an entirely different surname than their parents — but you’re probably still going to need some help figuring them all out!

A few tips to help you get your bearings:

If the person has a Westernized surname and their parents have an Arab one, they’re probably adopted.

If someone’s name is Abduladeen and they don’t wear a headscarf or show any other signs of devout faithfulness, chances are that you’ve got a convert on your hands! They may be more likely to use Arabic last names than traditional Christian ones.

Examples: ¨I’m not surprised people who can’t figure out how to pronounce my last name think it sounds like weet¨ [Abdullah], tweeted @lady_egyptian_.

¨They just made up some random consonant sound for us because we

Screenshot Title: Ian’s Blog Post

A blog post about Egyptian last names. This is a screenshot of the article in full, unedited form on my computer screen. I am not working with Google Docs or any other collaborative software at this time.

This was an example of what you might see when viewing a long-form piece of content that has been published to WordPress without being segmented into sections for easier reading and comprehension by readers looking for specific information. The point here is to illustrate how difficult it becomes as the length of your content grows – especially if there are no subheadings! It may seem like common sense but each paragraph should have its own topic sentence (first sentence) followed by relevant supporting details.

The following are the segmented parts of this long-form content, which has been broken down by section.

Section One: Introduction

Hello and welcome to this blog post. In my previous posts, I have covered a few different ways with which you can use WordPress without having to write any code or install third-party software such as Google Docs or Microsoft Office Suite. However, today’s topic is a bit more technical but also very interesting: migrating content from WordPress.com over to your own self-hosted WordPress site using the Tools Transporter plugin (written by John James Jacoby). This was an example of what you might see when viewing a long form piece of content that has been published to wordpress without being segmented into sections for easier reading and comprehension by readers looking for specific information. The point here is to illustrate how difficult it becomes for a reader to find information if every sentence is not numbered or bullet point.

This plugin uses the Google Tools API to import your WordPress posts, pages and comments into self-hosted WordPress site via an interface that you can access on your blog’s “Tools” menu. To use this tool, install it from the Plugin Directory and then navigate through its options by clicking the wrench icon in the top right corner of your Admin screen. The plugin will work best if you are using PHP version >= vPHP-v510 but there also might be some conflicts with Highly Optimized WP Theme (HOTWPT). However, as mentioned before, installing plugins does not require any coding knowledge so even someone without much expertise who has never used PHP before will be able to make use of the plugins. This plugin uses the Google Tools API to import your WordPress posts, pages and comments into self-hosted WordPress site via an interface that you can access on your blog’s “Tools” menu. To use this tool, install it from the Plugin Directory and then navigate through its options by clicking the wrench icon in the top right corner of your Admin screen. The plugin will work best if you are using PHP version >= vPHP-v510 but there also might be some conflicts with Highly Optimized WP Theme (HOTWPT). However, as mentioned before, installing plugins does not require any coding knowledge so even someone without much expertise who has never used PHP before